Empowering Girls: First Salon Cut

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I felt, after 6 years of free haircuts from NaNa, that $10 was an appropriate amount to spend for a first salon haircut.

After recently getting my own hair makeover, my daughter expressed an interest in getting hers cut “just like mine.”

Aware that a daughter’s desire to be “just like Mommy” is fleeting, I jumped at my chance.

I gave her highlights at home, while doing mine. (Of course, I wish mine had turned out as well as hers. The difference? I could see what I was doing on her hair. My own? I overbleached my bangs to a bad white, tried to cover it with a cotton candy pink, I had on hand from last year, that didn’t take. I had to wait till payday and color a solid brown and then bleach again.)

There is a story in the NY Times by Camille Sweeny about the trend for mothers to let their tweens get highlights. My friend Char from WearyParent is quoted.

Jezebel, of course, took issue with the fact that some children are being allowed to have highlights in a story titled, Bikini Waxes, Highlights & ‘Tramp Stamps’: That’s what little girls are made of.

I take issue with the fact that a feminist magazine uses the derogatory term “tramp stamp” in reference to women who get tattooed. Connecting a tattoo with a woman’s sexual promiscuity is like unto the old phrase, “she smokes, she pokes.”

I also think it’s a bit silly to equate hair color with a permanent tattoo. There is nothing permanent about hair, which makes it a harmless way to allow children, tweens and teens to experiment with their style, fashion or look and even rebellion. And the bikini wax – for starters, one is on their head which everyone sees and the other is . . . not. A bikini wax is also rather like torture, while a new hair color is, well – fun.

I allow Ainsley highlights for one reason only – because it’s fun.

Although I do agree with Jezebel, that the direct marketing to children by salons is messed up. I explain why I think so in this story, Girls For Sale.

Some of the hair professionals, in the NY Times story, advise infiltrating school and community functions where they have better access to young girls for their marketing. Gag me with a spoon.
Blond Ambition
Blond Ambition II
Beauty & Reality
Pink Hair Fiasco
Pink Hair Fiasco Take 2
Meaning of Hair

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